Project 1: Your first monoprints

Project 1: Your first monoprints

Experiments in mark making and painted plates

In this first project of Printmaking 1 course, I started exploring how monoprints work.

The relief printing inks I used are quite cheap and water based; I used red, blue and yellow for these experiments and obtained other hues by mixing them.

In the first mark making exercise I realised how quickly the colours were drying, so I had to try my best to be quite fast, as I could not add much water.

I used different kind of brushes and also a small palette knife to spread the colours on the glass, finally used ordinary cartridge paper to lift the ink off the plate.

Scan 100Scan 104Scan 102Scan 101

I have to say the most interesting part came when I started to mix the colours. By then I also started to gain confidence with the medium and tried to spread a background colour rather than just making marks.

When painting over the background, the colour looked like moving rather than mixing. The palette knife point dragged through the ink also moved it to the sides, exposing the plain glass.

Scan 105Scan 106Scan 107Scan 108

Considering that I had never tried mono printing before this was a very useful experiment to explore new techniques and effects and to start becoming familiar and confident with them.

Research point: Monoprints by Edgar Degas

I looked at Degas work with monoprints and actually realised how interesting is his approach to printmaking.

He was working on etched plates, modifying each single print by manipulating the ink and adding other mediums over the finished prints. What he was actually producing were monotypes.
The freedom in the approach is definitely what I can learn from Degas and his printed works. We are often scared by the ghost of perfection, mostly trying to do things following the rules, without realising how imperfection and experimentation produces far more interesting results.

Painted monoprint from life

I worked on a still life choosing two very simple objects, I placed them in different ways and sketched them a couple of times.

I then started with inking the plate. I found it quite hard in the first place to depict something onto glass with quite fluid colours, trying to make it recognisable and at the same time trying to work quickly.

The first print I pulled off was in fact quite a disaster. I found interesting the brush strokes in the depiction of the objects, but the overall impression is quite confused, due to the colours being exposed to the air for to long.

Scan 4

In my second attempt I tried working faster and adding a bigger quantity of colour on the plate. I also fixed the paper to the plate, so that I could work a second time on the areas that where less clear, by adding more colour. It definitely worked better, but I realised that the confused impression was also due to a poor choice in matching the colours, so I decided to try again, using a light background.

Scan 3

My third and last attempt worked definitely better, the image is more recognisable and at the same time it present interesting textures. Changing the orientation from portrait to landscape also helped to get a better overall impression.

Scan 5

I am satisfied with the last result, considering how poor was my confidence at the beginning. However I am definitely considering to get to work with some oil based inks, for richer textures and longer time span to work on more complicated figures.